Archive for January, 2012

2012 Rum Renaissance Festival returns to Miami Beach

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2012 Rum Renaissance Festival returns to Miami Beach

The fourth annual Miami Rum Renaissance Festival, the largest gathering of rum experts and professionals in the world, will commence April 16 to 22 in South Florida.

Rum judges from around the globe will convene to conduct their annualInternational Rum Expert Panel Tasting Competition while rum brands from the Caribbean and beyond assemble to promote their products at VIP parties and grand tasting events for the spirits trade. The event also draws eager rum enthusiast consumers from far and wide.

The week-long series of events begins on Monday, April 16 with the Bartender’s Bash event hosted by the best bartenders and mixologists in South Florida, sponsored by Barritt’s Ginger Beer, along with Fee Brothers bitters and specialty products.

In addition to VIP parties hosted all week for the trade, spirits press and professionals, the Grand Tasting events on Saturday, April 21 and Sunday, April 22 at the Deauville Beach Resort on Miami Beach are expected to attract thousands of rum enthusiasts throughout South Florida and more than 36 countries.

According to event organizers Robert and Robin Burr, their Miami Rum Fest has doubled in size each year, a testament to the fact that consumer interest in sugar cane spirits is growing rapidly, faster than any other category of liquor.

“The vast range of fine rums now coming to the market reinforces our prediction that rum is indeed enjoying a renaissance of appreciation,” said Robert Burr, festival promoter and author of Rob’s Rum Guide. “We’re seeing an explosion of top-tier family reserves, luxury sipping rums and premium products on the shelves in South Florida, with no signs of abatement. New rums are joining the legacy Caribbean classics to bolster the category and provide consumers with a fantastic array of choices of sipping rums. We’re also seeing many new high quality rums specially designed for creating great cocktails.”

The Miami Rum Renaissance Festival offers an unparalleled opportunity for consumers and the trade to learn about — and sample — the best rums in the world over the two-day grand tasting events. The festival features more than 20,000 square feet of exhibit space at the Deauville Beach Resort.

“We’re very excited to see so many new rum brands and island lifestyle products participating this year,” said Robin Burr, exhibits manager. “We’ve nearly doubled the size of our main exhibit space once again to bring festival partipants a wider variety of rums and related products from around the world.”

Rum lovers can choose between $40 day passes to the grand tasting events or $250 VIP passes granting all-access admission to a week long series of VIP parties and special events.

For more information on the Miami Rum Renaissance Festival, activities planned during Miami Rum Week and exhibits at Miami Rum Fest, visit the web site at www.RumRenaissance.com or call 305-443-7973.


links
http://www.rumrenaissance.com
http://www.giftedrums.com
http://www.examiner.com/rum-in-national/robert-burr
http://www.rumxp.com/


Press, for additional information, contact

Grace Grindler
Account Executive / Director of Social Media
Cheryl Andrews Marketing Communications
2655 Le Jeune Road, Suite 806, Coral Gables, FL 33134
P: 305.444.4033
F: 305.447.0415
E: grace@cam-pr.com
www.cam-pr.com

Heisting The Beard – A Novel By J.C. Perez

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Do you think the pirate days are over in the Caribbean? True, the tall ships no longer pounce on their prey from hidden island coves, but if you open up your imagination and dive into this book you’ll believe those days aren’t quite over yet.

Two years ago when I first started this Caribbean escapism blog, I was contacted by a gentleman named J.C. Perez. He lives in the southwest Florida area and took an early interest in the site. We exchanged email and even talked on the phone a few times. He told me he was an author and a native Cuban. I valued every time I got the chance to talk to him. He would tell me stories of Cuba, the Bahamas, drugs and the Florida Keys. As you can imagine I was fascinated and wanted to find out more about the under belly of the Caribbean. What, it’s not all rum runners, white sand and bikinis?

About 6 months or so ago J.C. sent me his new book, Heisting the Beard. It took me awhile to finally open it up, but once I did I was hooked like a mahi mahi. Heisting The Beard is a story that’s sprinkled with money, murder and a little bit of sex. Told through the eyes of the main character Kiki Logan, you’ll follow him through the Florida Keys, Havana Cuba and the Bahamas. The Beard, Cuba’s own Castro, has not only been stealing form the people of Cuba but from other Caribbean nations as well. Kiki has it in his mind to enact a little bit of revenge. Almost like a modern day Robin Hood, but does he survive and get away with it? Get the book to find out.

Here is the teaser from the back cover…

Kiki Logan is convinced by the well connected Banco to search for a large cache of treasure pulled from the depths of the Caribbean by the Cuban Government. On this perilous adventure, numerous characters join in, most notably David, Kiki’s connection in Cuba. Kiki and David try to locate the treasure in Cuba. They find a giant warehouse and upon raiding in, they discover cars, cocaine, and cash, as well as the infamous and elusive Golden Madonna statue. Will the treasure hunters be successful, or will the raid end, as many fear, in their deaths? And what will happen to the famous statue.

About The Author

J.C. Perez is a Cuban-American writer, born in Caibarien, Cuba in 1955. His great grandfather was a Cuban sugar baron, a Colono, who owned an immense sugar plantation in the middle of the island. Perez’s parents fled Caibarien for Havana in 1959 when Che Guevara’s troops hit Santa Clara. A product of the Peter Pan flights organized by the Catholic Church to get children out of the revolutionary turmoil, Perez ultimately grew up in suburban New Jersey, as what could best be described as a normal, middle-class American child. However, Perez spent many weekends in the hills of New Jersey playing war games. These weren’t the usual Boy Scout fare; they were sponsored by the CIA and were instrumental in what later became ine Bay of Pigs fiasco and many other insurgencies.

Arriving in Miami in 1977, Perez was at the center of a regional boom that was controlled by the Cubans. He became a significant player and in the process of traveling in order to meet his business obligations, he became familiar with the entire breadth of the Caribbean scene, from the Bahamas to Cartegena, and all the major players involved. Some of these people were reggae singers, some were drug lords, others business men.

Perez knew when to call it quits. He moved to the west coast of Florida and settled on a farm, cultivating his own garden and, to everyone’s surprise, he began to write.

Go get the book and let me know what you think. Its inspired me to take a deeper look into Cuba.

Cheers,
RumShopRyan

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On Island Time in Paradise – Cayman 2

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We came ashore late yesterday afternoon and found the island in the middle of a national celebration. It was National Heroes Day so we celebrated. It was a day to honor the heroes of an island that was discovered more than five hundred years ago and all of us decided to honor them as well. As expats we should always be mindful of those who allow us to join them in living in their paradise. While the main celebration was held over in Georgetown, ours was a good one.  …wish you were here.

William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise

On Island Time in Paradise – Cayman

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William Fair Roberts

January 23, 2012

I never stay in any one place for very long, and I think I had let my reasoning behind that slip away from me, but I think I may have reminded myself of it over the past few days. I came to the Caymans the week before Christmas and have been wandering the island, tasting its culture and making new friends.  Among them are natives from the islands, expatriates from almost everywhere on earth and other wanderers like me.  Through my years of traveling and wandering I have found that locals whether they are natives or expats are generally a blast to be around, but when all is said and done, a pretty “safe” bunch.  It is the wanders I have to look out for.

I know this.  It is a fact.  I know this really well, but still from time to time I have lapses in my memory and I forget that I should show some restraint.  I know this, but I lose myself in the momentary excitement.  I really do know it , but about a week ago, I became acquainted with a two couples sailing around the Caribbean in a beautiful 45’ Leopard Sloop.  They are from Australia and they are in the islands on holiday.  They decided to take some time off from their lives down under and come to the other side of the world for some rest and relaxation.  They definitely are on the other side of the world, but I don’t think anyone could say they are resting and relaxing.

I met them a week ago last Thursday at the Cracked Conch in West Bay.  I was there for one drink with a friend and the next thing I knew it I was sailing away with the sunset to my back.  I shared my bottle of Tortuga Rum with them and one thing led to another we were sailing away.  That bottle lasted about an hour between us and then we began to indulge in their private, onboard stock.  Before morning we had polished off a couple of more bottles, at least two dozen limes and who knows what else. We sailed most of the night and just before daylight anchored at the east end of the island, about a mile off of Gun Bay in 31 feet of water.  Behind us were the sunrise and the deep blue waters of the Caribbean and in front of us were the protected waters of Gun Bay in almost every shade of blue you can imagine.  We had been awake all night and the party was just beginning.  We watched the sun rise over the water and then all donned snorkels and went exploring beneath the waves.  Later, I borrowed their  kayak and a fly rod to fish the flats.  At the edge where the water drops from about one foot of depth to about six feet, I hooked a pretty good sized permit.  He played with me for a while but I finally got him in the kayak for our ride back to the catamaran.  I paddled my way back boat with my prize only to find I wasn’t the only lucky fisherman on board.  They had prepared a fabulous conch ceviche’ which we ate while the permit was fileted and grilled on the small grill at the stern of the boat.

By the time our coffee cups were empty we evolved to drinking beer.  We all rested on the deck to the sound of some CDs they had on board.  We listened to Capt. Nick, Sam Rainwater, Bob Marley, Brian Roberts and little classic Buffett.  After a while, we went ashore at in Gun Bay and I think I know what it felt like to be a pirate.  We went ashore a vengeance to party. We went from place to place teaching everyone in our path to celebrate and drink and sing and forget what inhibitions are.  For three days we stayed ashore, eating when we wanted to, sleeping when we needed to and celebrating life constantly.  At the end of a week with them, when we all boarded the boat for our next journey, there were eight of us ready to set sail for new horizons and new adventures.  Friday morning we set sail for Little Cayman .  With our bow pointed NE we began the 60+ mile trip. The following morning we were dropping anchor 1/3 of a mile of Blossom Village in about 10 feet of water.  I had stayed up all night with Gardner and Nessy  while they sailed the boat across the dark sea under the veil of stars.  I watched as the depth finder which marked us at 31 feet at the beginning of our voyage, sounded out readings which quickly went from 300’ to at times 7,800’ as we sailed the waves above the depths as we approached the Cayman Ridge about midway across our route.

Night sailing is magnificent and Gardner and Nessy, both good sailors give an assurance of safety as they effortlessly maneuver the craft among the waves to her destination.   Anchored next to us was a 52’ Jeanneau out of a port in Florida.  As I said, we were anchored off Blossom Village when I made a Freudian slip calling it Bosom Village, and everyone kidded me because the two women on the boat next to us were working on their “full-even suntans.” I pretty much took the joking in stride.  The weather has been great all week and the scenery has been even better.

I haven’t been on dry ground since last Friday when we left Cayman.  Yesterday we left little Cayman for Cayman Brac and we made the 14 miles in short order with favorable winds and clear weather.  Write now we are anchored less than 1,000’ from the beach in water that is so clear it looks like our boat is floating in air.  In about an hour we are all heading ashore to see what is awaiting our arrival on this tiny piece of land in the sea.  We ran out of beer on Sunday, so I am looking forward to finding a cold one with name on it and a lime to shove down its neck.

I know I have almost overstayed my welcome in the Caymans so I am thinking about charting a course farther south.  I don’t know where the wind will take me, but know I like it.

I hope you are enjoying yourself as much as I am enjoying mine here in this corner of paradise.

William Fair Roberts…on island time in paradise

The Roots of Trop Rock – Reggae

Posted in Island Enthusiasts, Reggae Roots Music | 3 Comments »

You can hear the influences of Reggae Music throughout Trop Rock.

Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broader sense to refer to most types of Jamaican music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that originated following on the development of ska and rocksteady.

Reggae is most easily recognized by the rhythmic accents on the off-beat, usually played by guitar and/or piano, known as the skank. This pattern accents the second and fourth beat in each bar (or the “and”s of each beat depending on how the music is counted) and combines with the drums emphasis on beat three to create a unique feel and sense of phrasing in contrast to most other popular genres focus on beat one, the “downbeat”. The tempo of Reggae is usually felt as slower than the popular Jamaican forms, ska and rocksteady, which preceded it.[1] It is this slower tempo, the guitar/piano offbeats, the emphasis on the third beat, and the use of syncopated, melodic bass lines that differentiates reggae from other music, although other musical styles have incorporated some of these innovations separately.

Bob Marley is said to have claimed that the word reggae came from a Spanish term for “the king’s music”.[5] The liner notes of To the King, a compilation of Christian gospel reggae, suggest that the word reggae was derived from the Latin regi meaning “to the king”.

Reggae developed from skamento and R&B music in the 1960s. The shift from rocksteady to reggae was illustrated by the organ shuffle, which was pioneered by Jamaican musicians like Jackie Mittoo and Winston Wright. This new technique was featured in the transitional singles “Say What You’re Saying” (1967) by Clancy Eccles, and “People Funny Boy” (1968) by Lee “Scratch” PerryThe Pioneers‘ 1967 track “Long Shot Bus’ Me Bet” has been identified as the earliest recorded example of the new rhythm sound that became known as reggae.[7]

Early 1968 was when the first genuine reggae records were released: “Nanny Goat” by Larry Marshall and “No More Heartaches” by The Beltones. American artist Johnny Nash‘s 1968 hit “Hold Me Tight” has been credited with first putting reggae in the American listener charts.[8] Around that time, reggae influences were starting to surface in rock music. An example of a rock song featuring a slight taste of reggae rhythm is 1968’s “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” by The Beatles.[9]

Bob Marley in 1980.

The Wailers, a band started by Bob MarleyPeter Tosh and Bunny Wailer in 1963, are perhaps the most recognised band that made the transition through all three stages of early Jamaican popular music: ska, rocksteady and reggae. Other significant reggae pioneers include Prince BusterDesmond Dekkerand Ken Boothe.

Notable Jamaican producers who were influential in the development of ska into rocksteady and reggae include: Coxsone DoddLee “Scratch” PerryLeslie KongDuke ReidJoe Gibbs and King TubbyChris Blackwell, who founded Island Records in Jamaica in 1960, relocated to England in 1962, where he continued to promote Jamaican music. He formed a partnership with Trojan Records, founded by Lee Gopthal in 1968. Trojan released recordings by reggae artists in the UK until 1974, when Saga bought the label.

The 1972 film The Harder They Come, starring Jimmy Cliff, generated considerable interest and popularity for reggae in the United States, and Eric Clapton‘s 1974 cover of the Bob Marley song “I Shot the Sheriff” helped bring reggae into the mainstream.[3] By the mid 1970s, reggae was getting radio play in the UK on John Peel‘s radio show, and Peel continued to play reggae on his show throughout his career. What is called the “Golden Age of Reggae” corresponds roughly to the heyday of roots reggae.

In the second half of the 1970s, the UK punk rock scene was starting to form, and reggae was a notable influence. Some punk DJs played reggae songs during their sets and some punk bands incorporated reggae influences into their music. At the same time, reggae began to enjoy a revival in the UK that continued into the 1980s, exemplified by groups like Steel PulseAswadUB40, and Musical Youth. Other reggae artists who enjoyed international appeal in the early 1980s include Third WorldBlack Uhuru and Sugar Minott. The Grammy Awards introduced the Best Reggae Album category in 1985.

Early reggae

The “Early reggae” era can be looked as as starting in roughly 1968. The influence of funk music from American record labels such as Stax began to permeate the music style of studio musicians and the slowing in tempo that occurred with the development of rocksteady had allowed musicians more space to experiment with different rhythmic patterns. One of the developments which separated early reggae from rocksteady was the “bubble” organ pattern, a percussive style of playing that showcased the eighth-note subdivision within the groove. The guitar “skanks” on the second and fourth beat of the bar began to be replaced by a strumming pattern similar to mento and the so-called double chop that can be heard so audibly in the introduction of Bob Marley’s “Stir It Up” was developed during this time. More emphasis was put on the groove of the music, and there was a growing trend of recording a “version” on the B-side of a single. The mass popularity of instrumental music in the Ska and Rocksteady eras continued in reggae, producing some of the most memorable recordings of the early reggae era. Cover versions of Motown, Stax and Atlantic Records soul songs remained popular in early reggae, often helping Jamaican artists gain a foothold in foreign markets such as the U.K. As a testament to it’s far reaching impact in other markets, this era and sound of reggae is sometimes referred to in retrospect as “skinhead reggae” because of its popularity among the working class skinhead subculture in the UK during the late 1960s and early 1970s. One Caribbean band based in London, The Pyramids, even released an entire album dedicated to the unruly English youth culture under the name Symarip which featured songs such as “Skinhead Moonstomp” and “Skinhead Girl”. Eventually the, often experimental, sounds of early reggae gave way to the more refined sound made popular by Bob Marley’s most famous recordings. Indeed this era seems fittingly capped off by the 1973 release of “Catch A Fire”. Notable artists from this era include John HoltToots & the Maytals and The Pioneers.

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The Story Behind Living Like a Pirate Clothing

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It all started in 2004 when I went to my first Jimmy Buffett concert.  We got there late.  The concert had not started but the party had been going on for hours.  The parking lot was a sea of revelers; grass skirts, coconut bikini tops and people with stuffed parrots perched on their shoulders.  Almost everyone had a rum drink in hand and a smile on their face.  When the concert started  The Coral Reefer Band and Jimmy Buffett were playing and singing in their bare feet.  The stage and the arena were alive, and then it happened.  “You got fins to the left, fins to the right, / and you’re the only girl in town.” He sang it and so did thousands of his fans…all in unison…every word, like it was their song.  Because the song they were singing was and is their song.

I knew at that moment that I wanted that lifestyle.  I wanted that freedom. I wanted to run through life on my bare feet.  I knew this wasn’t going to be easy.  I had obligations, but worse than that I couldn’t sing, but maybe I could do something.  In the days that followed that first concert of awakening, I came up with a basic concept for a life & a company.

This revelation I had really is no revelation at all….

Life is an Adventure
Treasure to be Hunted
The Hunt is the Treasure

So, I began to try Living like a Pirate.

It took me three years of strenuous, tedious exhausting Research & Development drinking Rum, going to concerts & traveling whenever I could.  I spent as much time as I could on any boat that availed itself to me.  I discovered the Caribbean, Miami & the Florida Keys. With this R&D under my belt things were beginning to fall into place

In 2009, three friends and I sailed around the British Virgin Islands on a rented catamaran. It was a phenomenal adventure.  We were off of Nelson Island, (the original Treasure Island) snorkeling, swimming and enjoying the magnificent water when it happened.  Somehow I almost drowned.  VISAR rescued me and took me to a hospital in Road Harbor, Tortola. It was there in the hospital, while I was recovering that I borrowed an iPod…it had one song on it.  Kenny Chesney’s  “I’m Alive.”  I don’t know if it was fate or prophetic, but that song provide me food for thought.  My life in Corporate America was about to come to a screeching halt.

I returned to the mainland and instead of worrying about what might have been and what almost happened, I had a vision.  The vision was to bring Living like a Pirate to life and introduce my idea, the idea of adventure and treasure to everyone that has the same desires I have.  It was time .

My world has changed.  Since 2009, LLAP has sold over 15,000 items for which I am very grateful.   The natural order of things has taken over and my eyes have been opened by the Parrotheads  and their “party with a purpose” attitude.  Enjoying life and helping others at the same time is the Pirate and the Parrot way.  We give back, 5% of our sales are contributed to charity. We have given to Visar, Planet Gumbo, Red Cross, Wounded Warriors, Soldier’s Angels, along with numerous Parrot Head causes.

What does Living like a Pirate mean and what is Living like a Pirate?

It is simple, we live by our Pirate rules.  Have fun, share the spoils & work with like-minded people.  Once we figured out, the rest was easy.  Our products are inspired by the search for adventure, a thirst for rum and the love of the seas.   We love charting our course and spending our times under the sun and the moon and stars.  For others it is a song that takes them back to a favorite vacation or a time by the surf listening to the waves as they pound rhythmically on the sand.  Living Like a Pirate may be as simple to some as a state of mind that guides them through the day-to-day doldrums of living, working and coping in today’s world.  Living like a Pirate has you in mind if you are a boater, a sailor, a Parrothead, Pirate  or just an old hippie with a free spirit and a will to live a free lifestyle.

Become a Rumskull, join our Crew & start “Living like a Pirate!”

Welcome aboard….

Dave

Featured Artist of the Week – Young Rebel Goombas

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Young Rebel Goombas hail from Long Island, New York. Tropical rockers, their sound is not so easily pigeon-holed. Each member brings a rich and varied musical background to create the luscious Goomba sound.

Richie Saccente plays guitar and shares lead vocals with his cousin Cosmo Mallardi, who also plays bass guitar. Brian “Uncle Bee” Johnson sings backup vocals and shares percussion duties with Randy Knudsen, also on vocals. Kevin McCann plays guitar and sings backup. Special guests on their debut album include Richie Cannata (sax player for Billy Joel, Elton John, The Beach Boys, etc.) and Bob Cassera on trombone.

Filmmaker Jake Gorst first met Saccente as a student in his guitar studio. Over the years they have worked on many projects together. For the Young Rebel Goomba album, Gorst assisted the band in the production of the CD.

Goomba means family. Like a big family, they share songwriting duties, and sometimes they bring friends into the mix. Gorst wrote lyrics for “Feather,” “Cajun Band,” “Summer Whine,” and “You Must Love Me.” Mallardi penned “All Day” and “Daydream Smile.” Bob Seng, who wrote for trop-rockers The Mangos, contributed “Library Book.” Saccente was responsible for the rest. Saccente attributes most of his success as a musician to his affinity for Duane Allman and Dicky Betts. Young Rebel Goombas even brought their family members into the studio to sing on “Sing-A-Long.”

Knudsen and Johnson have been playing together for approximately 15 years. It is safe to say each knows what the other is going to do musically even before he does it. This is why their set up really works with the two percussionists. The easiest way to describe their roles is the following: Knudsen has the hand drums and Johnson has the percussion instruments played with sticks, but along with that they split up a drum set, as well. Knudsen sits and plays which allows him to include a bass drum in his rig. Johnson incorporates the hi-hat and snare drum, and both have a multitude of cymbals in each of their set ups. This allows the band to have a fuller sound, like having a drum set and two percussionists with only two players. The interesting thing is they don’t step on each other musically, each having his specific role as percussionists.

The percussion Goombas are a bit comical because when they are playing together, they are having a great time. They poke fun at one another only because they are all enjoying what they are putting together on stage. The audience picks up on it at times and will feed off of it. If the Goombas are having a good time, their audience does the same.

Mallardi, Saccente, and Gorst received an Emmy® award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in 2007 for composing and arranging the soundtrack for the PBS documentary Farmboy.

Original Source

Sanibel Island Tops Arthur Frommer’s Top Destinations List

Posted in Island Enthusiasts | 1 Comment »

Sanibel Island listed as Arthur Frommer’s top destination? Yeah right.

Last night I had just gotten home from a little run down the street. I walked in the door, clicked on the tube to the local news and slammed a Gatorade trying to cool off. The excited news anchor was gushing how Southwest Florida’s own Sanibel Island had just topped Arthur Frommer’s “Favorite Destinations” list for 2012. Now our news anchors down here aren’t exactly grade A superstars, so errors sometimes do happen. Maybe they misunderstood Frommer’s list and are just saying Sanibel was in the top spot.

Still dripping with sweat (sexy, I know) I sat down at the computer and Google Frommer’s list. I find what I’m looking for on the Chicago Tribune, Arthur Frommer’s favorite travel destinations. There it was, right in front of my eyes, Sanibel Island, the seashell capital of the US, atop Frommer’s distinguished list. News person got it right!

Travel magnate, Arthur Frommer says the leisure enjoyed during the holiday season is a perfect time in which to plan future vacations. So he compiled a list of his own favorite destinations…it just so happens there are 10 of them.

Here is Frommer’s Top 10 Favorite Destinations

10. Kenya
9. New York City’s Greenwich Village
8. Chiang Rai, Thailand
7. Yachats, the Oregon Coast
6. Bonaire, one of the ABC islands of the Southern Caribbean
5. Cairo, Egypt
4. St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands
3. Paris, France
2. The Island of Bali, in Indonesia
1. Sanibel Island, Florida

Living just a short 35 minute drive from Sanibel, I sometimes pop over to the island for a little staycation time. The $6.00 toll to get on to the island is a little steep but the beauty is worth it. Sanibel is full of amazing seashell covered beaches, small boutique shops and just a laid back attitude. Home to the Ding Darling Nature Preserve which takes up more than half the island, it provides a home to thousands of birds, fish and I believe even some American Salt Water Crocodiles. If you haven’t been you should check it out.

Here is an Island Lime Video I shot on Sanibel a couple months ago. It’s easy to get lost in the beauty and the sound of the waves.

Cheers,
RumShopRyan

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Boat Drinks courtesy of Margaritaville

Posted in Boat Drinks, Rum | 1 Comment »

Mai Tai

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Margaritaville Silver Rum
  • 1 oz. Margaritaville Dark Rum
  • .5 oz. grenadine
  • .5 oz. orgeat syrup
  • .5 oz. lime juice
  • .5 oz. pineapple juice
  • .5 oz. orange juice

Directions:

Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake and pour into glasses.

THE PERFECT MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • .5 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • .5 oz Triple Sec
  • .5 oz Orange Curacao
  • .5 oz Lime juice
  • 2 Lime Wedges

Directions:Rim margarita glass with salt. Combine ingredients in a shaker filled with ice. Squeeze limes and add to tin. Shake vigorously and pour into a margarita glass.

COFFEE & CREAM

Ingredients:

  • 12.7 oz Kahlua
  • 12.7 oz Bailey’s Irish Cream

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake and pour into glasses.

“WHO’S TO BLAME?” MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • .5 oz Triple Sec
  • 4 oz Margaritaville® Margarita Mix

Directions:Rim margarita glass with salt. Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

UPTOWN TOP SHELF MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • .25 oz Cointreau®
  • 4 oz Margaritaville® Margarita Mix
  • .25 oz Float Grand Marnier®

Directions:Rim margarita glass with salt. Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice. Add float of Grand Marnier®.

Frozen Toasted Almond

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup Coffee Brandy
  • 1/2 cup Amaretto
  • 1/2 cup Vanilla Vodka
  • 1/2 cup Half and Half or Cream

Directions:Combine Kahlua, Amaretto, Vodka, Half and Half, and about 5 cups of ice in a blender. Blend and pour into glasses. Serves 3.

ITALIAN MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Margaritaville Calypso Coconut™ Tequila
  • .5 oz. Amaretto
  • 4 oz. Margaritaville® Margarita Mix

Directions:Rim margarita glass with sugar. Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

CALYPSO MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Margaritaville Calypso Coconut™ Tequila
  • .5 oz. Peach Schnapps
  • .5 oz Melon Liqueur
  • 3.5 oz. Margaritaville® Margarita Mix
  • Splash of pineapple juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

LAST MANGO IN PARIS

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • .5 oz Triple Sec
  • 4 oz Margaritaville® Mango Margarita Mix

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

PINK CADILLAC MARGARITA

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Margaritaville Last Mango™ Tequila
  • .5 oz. Cointreau®
  • 3.5 oz. Margaritaville® Margarita Mix
  • Splash of cranberry juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

BLUE MOON MARGARITAVILLE

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • .5 oz Blue Curacao
  • .5 oz Pineapple Juice
  • 3.5 oz Margaritaville® Margarita Mix

Directions:Rim margarita glass with sugar. Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

CACTUS COLADA

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • 1 oz Melon Liqueur
  • 2 oz Pína Colada Mix

Directions:Combine ingredients with 6 oz of ice in a blender. Blend until smooth. Pour into a tall glass.

CALYPSO COCONUT™ AND COKE®

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Margaritaville Calypso Coconut™ Tequila
  • 3 oz. Coke
  • Splash of Grenadine

Directions:Combine ingredients in a cocktail glass over ice.

MARGARITAVILLE® BLOODY MARIA

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • 4 oz tomato juice
  • 2 Lime Wedges
  • 1 quick shot Worcestershire Sauce
  • 7 dashes Tabasco Sauce
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions:Squeeze lime juice into a 16-ounce tumbler filled with ice. Add other ingredients and stir vigorously.

STRANDED ON A SANDBAR

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville Paradise Passion Fruit™ Tequila
  • .5 oz Peach Schnapps
  • 2 oz Orange juice
  • 2 oz Cranberry juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a tall glass with ice.

LAST MANGO™ AND SEVEN

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Margaritaville Last Mango™ Tequila
  • 3 oz. Sprite®

Directions:Combine ingredients in a cocktail glass over ice.

BRAVE BULL

Ingredients:

  • .75 oz Margaritaville® Gold Tequila
  • .75 oz Kahlua®

Directions:Combine ingredients in a cocktail glass over ice.

KEY WEST COOLER

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • .5 oz Cointreau®
  • .5 oz Cranberry juice
  • 1 oz Margaritaville® Margarita Mix
  • 2 tbs Sugar

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker filled with ice. Shake and pour into a margarita glass.

ISLAND LIME™ AND TONIC

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. Margaritaville Island Lime™ Tequila
  • 4 oz Tonic

Directions:Combine ingredients in a cocktail glass over ice.

TEQUILA SUNRISE

Ingredients:

  • 1.25 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • 4.5 oz Orange juice
  • Splash of Grenadine

Directions:Combine ingredients in a rocks glass filled with ice.

ISLAND BREEZE

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Margaritaville Calypso Coconut™ Tequila
  • 1 oz. Margaritaville Last Mango™ Tequila
  • 1.5 oz. Orange juice
  • 1 oz. Pineapple juice
  • 1.5 oz. Cranberry juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a tall glass with ice.

TROPICAL SUNRISE

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville Tropical Tangerine™ Tequila
  • 4.5 oz Orange juice
  • Splash of Grenadine

Directions:Combine ingredients in a rocks glass filled with ice.

ISLAND SUNRISE

Ingredients:

  • .75 oz.Margaritaville Calypso Coconut™ Tequila
  • .75 oz. Margaritaville Last Mango™ Tequila
  • 1 oz. Orange juice
  • 1 oz. Pineapple juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

INCOMMUNICADO

Ingredients:

  • .5 oz Vodka
  • .5 oz Margaritaville® Silver Tequila
  • .5 oz Rum
  • .5 oz Triple Sec
  • .25 oz Gin
  • .25 oz Grenadine
  • 1 oz Pineapple juice
  • 1 oz Cranberry juice
  • 1.5 oz Margaritaville® Margarita Mix

Directions:Combine ingredients in a shaker. Shake and pour into a margarita glass with ice.

BEACHCOMBER

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Margaritaville Silver Rum
  • 1 oz. triple sec
  • .25 oz. maraschino liqueur
  • .5 oz. lime juice

Directions:Combine ingredients in a cocktail glass over ice.

RUM TODDY

Ingredients:

  • 3 Cloves
  • Cinnamon Stick
  • 1 tsp Honey
  • 5 oz Hot Water
  • 2 oz Margaritaville Dark Rum
  • Nutmeg
  • Lemon Slice

Directions:Heat the water and pour into a mug. Stir in remaining ingredients. Garnish with nutmeg and lemon slice. Serve warm.

 

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Island-Style Recipes from Margaritaville

Posted in Island Enthusiasts | Comments Off on Island-Style Recipes from Margaritaville

Island-Style Recipes from Margaritaville

Coconut Shrimp with Mustard Balsamic Vinaigrette

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons mustard
  • ½ cup Balsamic Dressing
  • One 10 oz. package Margaritaville Calypso Coconut Shrimp
  • 4 cups of your favorite blended salad mix
  • 12 cherry tomatoes cut in half
  • 12 snap peas cut in half; substitute snow peas if you wish
  • 1/2 cup mixed diced peppers any blend of belle pepper
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds (optional)
  • 1/4 cup coconut toasted (optional)

Directions:

Mix mustard with dressing and set aside. Cook Calypso Coconut Shrimp according to package directions. Place cooked shrimp and vegetables in a large salad bowl and toss gently with dressing. Sprinkle with toasted coconut and almonds and serve.

Jamaican Coconut Shrimp and Potato Fries

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Margaritaville Calypso Coconut Shrimp
  • 2 large potatoes (Idaho, Sweet potatoes, or Yukon Gold) cut into ¾ inch strips
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • 1 Tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions:Lightly coat a 15” x 10” x 1” baking pan with cooking spray. Arrange potatoes in a single layer in pan. Sprinkle potatoes with chili powder and salt. Bake at 400 F for 15 minutes or until light brown. Arrange shrimp on sheet pan with potatoes and bake for an additional 13 to 15 minutes or until shrimp and potatoes are golden brown. Serve shrimp and fries with Mango Chutney Dippin’ Sauce.

Calypso Coconut Shrimp Salad

Servings: 2

Oven Directions:Toss baby greens with orange sections, diced red peppers, sliced red peppers and diced avocado. For dressing combine enclosed Mango Chutney Dippin’ Sauce with 1 Tablespoon salad oil and curry powder to taste. Top salad with prepared Calypso Coconut Shrimp, drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with toasted almonds. Serve immediately.

Grill Directions:Prepare salad and dressing as described above. Place shrimp in a single layer in a foil pan; cover grill and cook over medium heat for 15 minutes or until coating is crunchy. Top salad with shrimp, drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with toasted almonds. Serve immediately.

Caribbean Shrimp Dip

Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • ½ cup thin sliced red peppers
  • ½ cup thin sliced green peppers
  • ¼ cup chopped green onions
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 cups soft style cream cheese
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil

Directions:Cook Island Lime Shrimp according to the package directions, when slightly cooled, chop the shrimp into bite size pieces, in a separate pan, sauté the peppers in the olive oil for five minutes over medium heat until soft. Add cream cheese and heavy cream, whisk briskly to blend. Once blended add shrimp and its sauce. Pour into a crock. Serve with warm toasted pita triangles, grilled French bread slices, bagel chips, crackers or tortilla chips.

Shrimp in Cilantro Tomato Blush Sauce

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

  • One 1-1/2 lb. package Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • 1 clove chopped garlic
  • 1 cup chopped tomato
  • 1 can (14-1/2oz) chicken broth
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • ½ cup light cream
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 lb. cooked angel hair pasta or thin spaghetti

Directions:In large skillet over medium heat, sauté shrimp and garlic for 8-10 minutes, turning shrimp during cooking. Add tomatoes, chicken broth and 1/4 cup cilantro. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and stir in cream blended with cornstarch until slightly thickened. Remove from heat and serve over pasta. Sprinkle remaining cilantro over pasta.

Portabella Stuffed Lime Shrimp

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • 2 Portabella mushrooms
  • 1 Tablespoon white wine
  • 6 Fresh cut-up asparagus spears
  • ¼ cup diced red peppers
  • Cooked couscous
  • Olive oil

Stove Top Directions:Sauté two portabella mushrooms (gills removed) in olive oil until tender. In another pan, cook Island Lime Shrimp according to package directions, adding 1 Tablespoon of white wine, 6 fresh cut-up asparagus spears, and ¼ cup diced red peppers. Fill mushroom caps with cooked couscous and top with shrimp/asparagus mixture.

Grill Directions:Preheat grill to medium-high. Place Island Lime Shrimp and 1 Tablespoon white wine in a foil pan on grill. Coat two large portabella mushrooms (gills removed), 6 large asparagus with oil and ¼ cup red pepper slices, placed directly on grill. Cook for 8-10 minutes, turning often, until shrimp is done and vegetables are tender. Fill mushroom caps with cooked couscous and top with cut-up asparagus, red peppers and shrimp with sauce.

Island Lime Shrimp Gratin

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • Two 8 oz. packages Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • 1 cup mashed potato
  • 1 cup mushrooms, quartered and cooked
  • ½ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

Directions:Cook the shrimp according to the directions on the box. Spread the mashed potato over the bottom of a casserole dish. Sprinkle with the mushrooms and shrimp to cover evenly. Sprinkle with the mozzarella cheese. Bake in a 350( oven until the cheese is melted and bubbly.

Orzo Paella with Island Lime Shrimp

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • 2 cups orzo pasta, cooked and cooled
  • 1/2 cup mixed peppers
  • 1 cup smoked sausage, diced (as mild or spicy as you like)
  • 8 mussels or clams
  • 1/2 cup shrimp broth
  • 1/4 cup Cilantro, chopped
  • 2 strands Saffron

Directions:Cook the shrimp according to the directions on the box. Add the remaining ingredients except the pasta and simmer, covered until mussels or clams open. Add the pasta and toss to coat evenly. Serve in a platter with fresh crisp bread.

Island Lime Shrimp Veronica

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups white rice, cooked
  • Two 8 oz. packages Margaritaville Island Lime Shrimp
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup white seedless grapes, sliced in half
  • 1/4 cup white wine

Directions:Cook the shrimp according to the directions on the box. Add the heavy cream and grapes and bring to a boil. Add the white wine, season to taste with Salt and Pepper. Serve in a platter over the rice.

Jerk Shrimp Tomato Bruschetta

Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cups chopped ripe tomatoes
  • ½ cup chopped green pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped basil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 loaf sliced grilled or toasted French bread

Directions:Cook Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp according to package directions. Remove shrimp from pan. In skillet add garlic, olive oil, tomatoes, green peppers, basil, salt and pepper. Heat through for 1 minute. To serve, spoon tomato mixture on French bread slice and top with shrimp.

Louisiana Style Shrimp and Smoked Sausage Gumbo

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

  • One 1-1/2 lb. package Margaritaville Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves chopped garlic
  • 1 lb sausage (Kielbasa, Mild or Hot Italian, Chorizo) cut into 1/2” slices
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1 can (16 oz.) crushed tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 can (14 oz.) chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 cup fresh or thawed frozen cut green beans
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper sauce (optional)
  • Hot cooked rice

Directions:Cook shrimp in large skillet over medium high heat for 5 minutes, turning frequently. Remove from pan. Heat oil and brown the sausage. Add garlic, pepper and onions. Sauté until slightly brown. Return shrimp to pan. Add tomatoes, chicken broth, green beans and hot pepper sauce. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Serve with hot cooked rice.

Jerk Shrimp Fajitas

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • One 8oz. package Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp
  • ½ red pepper, sliced
  • ½ yellow pepper, sliced
  • 2 slices of red onion
  • 4 flour tortillas
  • Optional: guacamole, sour cream, salsa, chopped cilantro

Stove Top Directions:Sauté Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp, ½ red pepper sliced, ½ yellow pepper sliced and 2 slices of red onion in a dry medium-size pan over medium heat for 8-10 minutes. Divide shrimp, peppers and onion between 4 warmed flour tortillas. Top each with guacamole, sour cream and/or salsa. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro.

Grill Directions:Preheat grill to medium-high. Place Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp in foil pan on grill. Coat ½ red pepper, ½ yellow pepper and thick red onion slices with olive oil and place directly on grill. Cook for 8-10 minutes, turning often until vegetables are tender and shrimp is done. Slice peppers and onions. Fill 4 warmed flour tortillas. Top each with guacamole, sour cream, salsa and/or chopped cilantro.

Jerk Shrimp Pasta

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup mixed pepper, diced (any blend of belle pepper)
  • 1/2 cup mushrooms, quartered
  • Two 8 oz. packages Margaritaville Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp
  • 6 asparagus spears, cooked and trimmed to 1 inch sticks
  • 1/2 cup sweet potatoes, peeled, cooked and diced
  • 2 cups of your favorite Pasta, cooked

Directions:Sauté the mushrooms and peppers in the oil until just tender. Add the shrimp and cook per the package directions. Add the asparagus and sweet potato and simmer until just heated. Place the cooked pasta in the microwave and heat for 1 minute. Toss the pasta with the shrimp and vegetables. Serve in a platter.

Jerk Shrimp Dip

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • One 8 oz. package Margaritaville Jammin Jerk Shrimp
  • 1 cup cream cheese, softened
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup green onions, cleaned and chopped

Directions:Cook shrimp according to package and let cool. Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until just blended. Serve with your favorite chip.

New Orleans Style Barbecue Shrimp

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

  • Two 8 oz packages Margaritaville Jammin’ Jerk Shrimp
  • 1 cup dark beer
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 Tablespoons barbecue sauce

Directions:Place the shrimp, beer and butter in a pan and simmer until the shrimp are cooked (about 8-10 minutes). Add the BBQ sauce and bring to a boil. Serve with rice and your favorite crisp bread.

 

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