Archive for March, 2018

Buffett performs in Baltimore

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Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band performed last night at the Royal Farms Arena in Baltimore MD.

The set list from the show is now available. Caroline Jones was the opening act for the show and came back and joined Buffett on vocals for “Come Monday” and “Margaritaville”. She has a new album which just came out called “Bare Feet“.

Buffett performed the song “Beautiful Swimmers” for the second time live in concert (last played 9/03/2009 in Bristow VA). The song was inspired from a book about blue crabs called “Beautiful Swimmers” (by William Warner) and how they migrate around Chesapeake Bay.

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/31/27468/

Jimmy Buffett appears on Hawaii Five-0

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Jimmy Buffett re-praised his role as Frank Bama on the CBS show Hawaii Five-0 last night. He has appeared on four other episodes of Hawaii Five-O (November 2011, April 2013, March 2015, and January 2017).

Watch the episode at CBS.com (Buffett appears at the beginning of the show starting at 5:20).

Hawaii Five-0 – S8 Episode 18 – E ho’oko kuleana
Air Date: 03/30/18

Synopsis: The ex-wife of the man who shot Danny comes to Oahu and reveals how Danny’s protection during a dangerous domestic dispute when he was in New Jersey helped save her life. Also, Tani and Junior are assigned to walk the beat as uniformed officers for the day, and Adam is framed for the murder of the crime boss he has been tracking. (TV-14 V)

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/31/27462/

Jimmy Buffett appears on Hawaii Five-0

Posted in Jimmy Buffett News | Comments Off on Jimmy Buffett appears on Hawaii Five-0

Jimmy Buffett re-praised his role as Frank Bama on the CBS show Hawaii Five-0 last night. He has appeared on four other episodes of Hawaii Five-O (November 2011, April 2013, March 2015, and January 2017).

Watch the episode at CBS.com (Buffett appears at the beginning of the show starting at 5:20).

Hawaii Five-0 – S8 Episode 18 – E ho’oko kuleana
Air Date: 03/30/18

Synopsis: The ex-wife of the man who shot Danny comes to Oahu and reveals how Danny’s protection during a dangerous domestic dispute when he was in New Jersey helped save her life. Also, Tani and Junior are assigned to walk the beat as uniformed officers for the day, and Adam is framed for the murder of the crime boss he has been tracking. (TV-14 V)

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/31/27462/

Buffett performs at the US Naval Academy

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Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band performed last night at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis MD. The 2018 tour kicks off on Friday at the Royal Farms Arena in Baltimore MD.

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/29/27454/

Buffett rehearsing at the US Naval Academy

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Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band are rehearsing at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis MD before they kick off the 2018 tour on Friday at the Royal Farms Arena in Baltimore MD.

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/28/27449/

The More You NOAA: Local Voices Make a Big Impact

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Our ocean is powerful, covers two-thirds of the planet and is home to incredibly diverse ecosystems. Our ocean also supports growing human uses and economies. The role of managing our ocean resources in a sustainable manner is the job of our local, state and federal government agencies, often through collaboration.

Unfortunately, funding at the federal level for our premier ocean and coastal agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is currently under threat. This funding is critical to ensure proper management and collaboration. Despite the recent victories on NOAA funding for this current year, last month, the Administration proposed over $1 billion in cuts to NOAA for fiscal year 2019, a nearly 20% of the agencies entire operating budget. There are several key programs that could completely disappear or see significant funding reductions under that proposal, including our Coastal Zone Management program, National Sea Grant, Arctic Research, fisheries enforcement and more.

I sat down with Addie Haughey, Associate Director of Government Relations, to talk about the funding advocacy work she has been involved with, and the importance of communities reaching out to their elected officials.

Katie:     Can you tell me a little about the work you were doing in Washington, DC over the past few weeks?

Addie:    Money is on people’s minds on Capitol Hill right now, and in early March our team here at Ocean Conservancy—along with a dozen other individuals from Maine, New York and Florida, representing a variety of ocean-related backgrounds—met with congressional offices to talk about its importance! Our goal was to highlight how important funding is for all parts of NOAA.

All the different offices and programs within NOAA feed into and support each other, so you can’t short-change one part without short-changing the whole. And these programs do a lot of good. The folks that came to town demonstrated some of that good for elected officials.

Katie:     What were some of the stories people were sharing?

Addie:    I spent time with our New York delegation. The stories they told about their work, and the benefits NOAA brings to New Yorkers and the environment were fascinating.

When many people think about New York City—even people who live there—they don’t often think about the vibrant ocean life that is right at its doorstep. But folks like Paul Sieswerda, Executive Director of Gotham Whale, connect New Yorkers to their ocean neighbors through whale watch cruises and citizen science. Folks can see humpback whales with New York’s skyline in the background! Paul has seen and been a part of the success stories of conservation efforts informed by data. NOAA scientists help collect data, benefitting whales and ports and weather forecasting.

NOAA also helps educate and inspire the city’s youth to be stewards of their environment. Groups like the Rockaway Waterfront Alliance facilitate such invaluable opportunities for residents from underserved communities.

Katie:     Why is it important that elected officials hear directly from constituents?

Addie:  The folks who visited us to share their stories with congressional offices are personally and professionally benefiting from NOAA and its diverse array of important programs. Elected officials really do listen to their constituents, and when those constituents have compelling examples of NOAA helping people, it shows how bad an idea it would be for congress to cut funding to those programs.

Katie:     So we know that there is a proposal right now that would cut over $1 billion from NOAA. But that is just the start to a long process of deciding how much money it will ultimately receive. What can we expect out of Congress next?

Addie:    The advocacy process for fiscal year 2019 funding is just starting. The House of Representatives has already started holding budget hearings to discuss what funding levels should look like for next year, and will start working towards their own proposals to respond to the Administration’s budget request.

Katie:     So Congress is just getting started in deciding how to fund ocean and coastal programs. What can people do to make sure their member of Congress knows their constituents support robust funding for key ocean and coastal programs?

Addie:    Call your member of Congress or write them a personal letter! Tell them that funding for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration needs to be robust, and that programs across the agency are critical for our environment and economy.

Article source: https://oceanconservancy.org/blog/2018/03/28/noaa-local-voices-make-big-impact/

Buffett adds Salt Lake City to SOASOAS Tour

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Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band will visit the Vivint Smart Home Arena in Salt Lake City on Wednesday October 17 as part of his Son Of a Son Of a Sailor Tour. Buffett last performed in Salt Lake City 26 years ago during the “Recession Recess Tour” (set list: 8/25/92 – Delta Center).

Tickets go on sale Friday March 30th at 10 a.m.

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Article source: http://www.buffettnews.com/2018/03/27/27446/

When a Maximum is Minimum: What Low Sea Ice Extent Means for the Arctic

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In the Arctic, starting in autumn, cold weather causes sea ice to form and grow throughout the winter. By March, sea ice has extended as far as it will for the year, also known as the sea ice maximum. When spring warmth takes hold, the ice retreats again until September, when it reaches the annual sea ice minimum. NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center have both announced that Arctic sea ice extent recently reached its winter maximum for 2018. Spring has arrived and the ice is now starting to melt. NASA began measuring sea ice extent from satellites in 1979. This year is the second-lowest maximum on record, surpassed only by last year. The four years with the lowest sea ice maxima are the last four years.

Reports about sea ice extent are usually accompanied by a map, comparing this year to past years (often the 1981-2000 average used as a baseline), or by a graph, with colored lines comparing the seasonal growth and decline of sea ice year by year. These figures are helpful ways of displaying basic information, but of course there is much more to the story than just the aggregate measure of how much of the ocean is covered by sea ice.

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© NSIDC

In February of this year, major storms hit the northern Bering Sea. In a winter with sea ice, the winds blow over the top of the ice, making snow drifts in the lee of pressure ridges created when ice floes ram together. The snow drifts create denning habitat for seals to bear young. The wind can push the ice onto shore, creating large ridges of ice that can even rise up bluffs and topple on the unwary. The archeological record shows ancient houses on the coast that have been crushed in this way. Fortunately, sea ice movement that violent is rare.

Without sea ice, winds create a very different hazard. In the St. Lawrence Island Yupik village of Gambell and the Iñupiat village of Little Diomede, big waves threatened buildings and beaches, compounding the damage from the wind itself. A power outage in Diomede may have contributed to a house fire at the end of the storm. Similar storms in open water conditions have caused major coastal erosion at other villages in northern and western Alaska, undermining buildings and nearly destroying a runway. In a village with no access except by air, that’s a big problem.

Sea ice is important habitat for Arctic marine mammals. It also plays a big role in regulating marine productivity. Sea ice algae grow on the bottom of the ice, supporting the bottom of the food web. By reducing the effects of wind on the water column, the ice helps create stable conditions for the spring plankton bloom that makes the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas among the world’s most productive. Take sea ice away, and we have a very different marine system.

Low sea ice extent at the end of winter also sets the Arctic Ocean up for a major retreat of sea ice over the summer. Weather conditions and other factors will determine how much ice is left at the September sea ice minimum, but thin ice now makes the Arctic susceptible to rapid melting or to winds that blow ice away from much of the ocean. As ice melts earlier in the spring, the open water has more time to warm, which will delay next fall’s freeze-up. Warmer water will also hurt some species and help others, nudging the Arctic marine ecosystem further away from what it has been.

Bowhead whales will continue to migrate north this month, as they have always done. Ringed seals will have pups. Indigenous hunters will be out to provide food for their families and their communities. But the conditions will be a little less familiar. The ice will be a little less reliable. Animals from the waters to the south will come a little farther into the Arctic. The maps and graphs will chart the progress of ice melt and growth, and it will be up to all of us to interpret what that means for the Arctic we care about.

But, there’s hope! At Ocean Conservancy, we work in the U.S. and across the Arctic to help citizens and decision-makers alike understand what’s at stake in this region. We advocate science-based solutions to ensure that Arctic waters remain healthy and clean. This includes working towards treaties designed to ensure cooperation on marine management, the development of a network of marine protected areas, and ensuring we have the best scientific information available to develop management plans for this remote and rapidly changing region.

Article source: https://oceanconservancy.org/blog/2018/03/27/maximum-minimum-low-sea-ice-extent-means-arctic/

Jack Johnson’s Recycling PSA, and Other Takeaways from the 6th International Marine Debris Conference

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In the scheme of ocean-related conferences (of which there are actually quite a few now), the recently wrapped Sixth International Marine Debris Conference (6IMDC) was unique.

Whereas many international confabs are designed to attract heads of state or other high-ranking government officials, often gunning for framework agreements or commitments after two days of “high-level” discussions, 6IMDC was far more granular. Organized by NOAA and the United Nations Environment Programme and held in San Diego, the goal was to go deep in the weeds—the kelp, if you will. Over 70 technical sessions covered pretty much any and every aspect of the marine debris problem that you can think of, from grassroots organizing around plastic bag bans to corporate social responsibility on plastic production, from best practices in educating young students about ocean trash to social justice and inclusivity in the trash-free seas movement.

As if the 70+ sessions weren’t enough, the five-day conference also included a poster night, where researchers presented new findings on the prevalence of microfibers in Mediterranean fish populations, the impact of sunlight on the molecular structure of plastic, and the effectiveness of bottle bills in reducing plastic beach trash, among many other ocean trash-related inquiries. Mid-week, attendees were able to participate in one of several planned field trips, including a local beach cleanup; a visit to the working waterfront of San Diego Bay; and an ocean plastic monitoring cruise, to name a few. On the fourth night, the San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival—which wrapped up just last month—screened a selection of film entries relating to ocean trash (including mini documentaries and even a few animated shorts like “Ain’t No Fish” and “Gloop”). And the venue itself, which of course was made completely zero-waste with reusable utensils, glasses and even chalkboard name tags, was decorated with student artwork on marine debris and featured a back room of professional art installations on the topic.

Given all that went on over the course of the conference and the many different ways of experiencing it—panel discussions, science presentations, art, movies and more—there’s no single fixed set of takeaways to report. But here’s what struck me:

Women are crushing it.

I think this Tweet says it all.There was no shortage of women scientists, officials, and activists showing leadership on the marine debris issue. In fact, all three scientists presenting at the “State of the Science Panel” plenary session were women, not to mention key members of an NCEAS scientific working group on marine debris that Ocean Conservancy initiated in 2011.

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© Jordana Merran

A lot of people care about marine debris and are working to solve the problem.

Approximately 700 people attended this conference from all over the world, representing all aspects of the issue. I met scientists from Germany, Turkey, and Vietnam; advocates from tiny island states like Vanuatu and giant countries like Australia; students from the US, UK

IMG_1491IMG_1491
© Jordana Merran

and Indonesia. There were researchers, activists, and plastics manufacturers; people who work on beach cleanups and underwater cleanups; entrepreneurs developing new ways of tackling ocean plastic; artists and more. Musician and ocean advocate Jack Johnson performed three songs at the closing plenary (including a “PSA” about ocean trash), just a day after his wife and manager Kim shared the many ways that the couple is working to reduce single-use plastic waste at music venues and concerts. See the performance by clicking here!

There are lots of different ways to tackle marine debris, and everyone can play a role.

Just as attendees were diverse, so, too, were their perspectives and approaches to tackling the ocean plastic problem. Some have prioritized cleanup activities. Others have prioritized education, and sensitizing the next generation to the threat of trash to healthy oceans. Some think that the answer is to ban all single-use plastics; others think materials innovation is the answer. Ocean Conservancy believes we need to focus on accelerating improvements in waste management in those countries that disproportionately contribute to the problem. But it’s also our view that none of these approaches alone will solve the global problem of ocean plastic; all of them together, however, stand a chance of stemming the tide.

We need more science.

Despite the headlines and the frequency with which we hear of new studies in the press, there’s an awful lot of stuff we don’t know when it comes to marine debris. Scientists are still trying to identify where all the plastic goes and how much is actually out there. And while we now know that many animals ingest plastic, the implications for their health are still unclear (and as Dr. Chelsea Rochman, an Ocean Conservancy science fellow and Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto, emphatically stated in her presentations at 6IMDC, we know nothing about the effects of plastic-contaminated seafood on humans.)

It’s clear from the conference that the ocean plastic issue has a hold on the scientific and ocean community; and though a seventh IMDC has yet to be announced (they are not an annual affair), the desire for more regular interventions like these was palpable. Rest assured that until the next one, Ocean Conservancy’s Trash Free Seas team, and the many folks dedicated to solving the marine debris crisis, will continue working toward a healthy ocean free of trash.

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Student artwork featured at the 6th IMDC © Jordana Merran

Article source: https://oceanconservancy.org/blog/2018/03/26/jack-johnsons-recycling-psa-takeaways-6th-international-marine-debris-conference/

NOFX’s Fat Mike Announces “Camp Punk In Drublic”

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The NOFX frontman and owner of Fat Wreck Chords announced this morning that Punk In Drublic, his craft beer and punk rock celebration, will have a three-day leg in Ohio. NOFX, Rancid, The Interrupters, Pennywise, The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Goldfinger, and more will take to the woods outside of Thronville, Ohio from June 1st to June 3rd for a camping-friendly festival of punk music.PunkInDrublic

The three-day lineup features two full days of music, a “Kickoff Party” Friday night, and all kinds of activities throughout, including a movie theater, tug of war, a flea market, and dodgeball against the bands. Each night will end with Campfire Tales from the Road, where members of select bands will tell stories and answer questions from festival goers.

Fat Mike writes of his upcoming festival: “There will be 17 great bands, 2 mediocre bands, and 5000 kegs of beer. What could possibly go wrong?”

Early bird tickets only available Friday, March 30 until 11:59pm.

The festival will even feature its own barbers, so feel free to hold off on your mohawk until you arrive.

See more at: PunkInDrublicFest.com

Related Links:
Fat Wreck Chords Website
Punk In Drublic Website
Punk In Drublic Facebook

Article By: Aidan Leddy

Listen: NOFX – Punk In Drublic Album

This entry was posted on Monday, March 26th, 2018 at 10:46 am and is filed under Daily News.
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Article source: http://www.thepier.org/nofxs-fat-mike-announces-camp-punk-in-drublic/