Posts Tagged reggae

Producer Don Corleon Talks Inner Circle’s Influence on Reggae and New Projects with Ne Yo and Sean Paul

Posted in Reggae Roots Music | Comments Off on Producer Don Corleon Talks Inner Circle’s Influence on Reggae and New Projects with Ne Yo and Sean Paul
Large up & GIVE THANKS !! This is Dreddy Dred from di Inner Circle Crew! Just updating you on what a wonderful and blessed year Inner Circle is having! 
Check out all di videos & di links ! For more information stay in touch with Inner Circle by logging on to BadBoysofReggae.com .For bookings contactLourdes.CircleHouse@gmail.com
For any PR, Drops, or Dubs contact BB atInnerCirclemp3@gmail.com
JAH RASTAFARI!!
PRODUCER DON CORLEON TALKS 
INNER CIRCLE’S INFLUENCE ON REGGAE MUSIC
Don Corleon
HIGHLIGHTS OF 2013 INNER CIRCLE SHOWS
Inner Circle Live From Ventspils City 
Festival in Latvia
Inner Circle at Furuvik Reggae Festival 2013 in Sweden
Inner Circle Live at Viru in 
Tallinn Estonia 
Inner Circle at the Kaliningrad City Jazz Festival in Russia
Inner Circle Live at Overjam Festival 2013 in Slovenia 
Inner Circle Performs at Grassroots Festival in Virginia Key Beach
CLICK BELOW TO WATCH VIDEOS
 
The OFFICIAL Video for Inner Circle ft. Slightly Stoopid & Bizerk. Watch for the cameos from SOJA, Da Professor, & Rootz Underground.
 
The OFFICIAL Video for “This Is Reggae Music” Inner Circle featuring The Reggae Wave

Inner Circle Behind The Scenes of Slightly Stoopid & Capleton’s “No Cocaine” from the VANS Dub Rockers Compilation
PRODUCER SUPA DUPS aka BLACK CHINEY TALKS 
INNER CIRCLE’S INFLUENCE ON REGGAE MUSIC
Supa Dups
STAY IN CONTACT
    

Inner Circle Celebrates a Magnificent Year for Reggae Music with Fans All Around The World

Posted in Island Enthusiasts, Reggae Roots Music, Trop Rock Artists, Trop Rock Happenings | Comments Off on Inner Circle Celebrates a Magnificent Year for Reggae Music with Fans All Around The World

Large up & GIVE THANKS !! This is Dreddy Dred from di Inner Circle Crew! Just updating you on what a wonderful and blessed year Inner Circle is having! 
Check out all di videos & di links ! For more information stay in touch with Inner Circle by logging on to BadBoysofReggae.com .For bookings contactLourdes.CircleHouse@gmail.com
For any PR, Drops, or Dubs contact BB atInnerCirclemp3@gmail.com
JAH RASTAFARI!!
HIGHLIGHTS OF 2013 INNER CIRCLE SHOWS
Inner Circle Live From Ventspils City 
Festival in Latvia
Inner Circle at Furuvik Reggae Festival 2013 in Sweden
Inner Circle Live at Viru in 
Tallinn Estonia 
Inner Circle at the Kaliningrad City Jazz Festival in Russia
Inner Circle Live at Overjam Festival 2013 in Slovenia 
Inner Circle Performs at Grassroots Festival in Virginia Key Beach
INNER CIRCLE HITS 2.5 MILLION VIEWS WITH REGGAE REMIX OF
YOUNG WILD & FREE FT I-OCTANE & BIZERK
CLICK BELOW TO WATCH VIDEOS
 
The OFFICIAL Video for Inner Circle ft. Slightly Stoopid & Bizerk. Watch for the cameos from SOJA, Da Professor, & Rootz Underground.
 
The OFFICIAL Video for “This Is Reggae Music” Inner Circle featuring The Reggae Wave

Inner Circle Behind The Scenes of Slightly Stoopid & Capleton’s “No Cocaine” from the VANS Dub Rockers Compilation
INNER CIRCLE HITS 2.5 MILLION VIEWS WITH REGGAE REMIX OF
YOUNG WILD & FREE FT I-OCTANE & BIZERK
STAY IN CONTACT
    

Get Mishka’s New EP, Featuring Jimmy Buffett

Posted in Boat Drinks, Island Enthusiasts, Reggae Roots Music, Trop Rock Artists | Comments Off on Get Mishka’s New EP, Featuring Jimmy Buffett

 

Renowned reggae artist Mishka has released a new EP entitled Ocean Is My Potion.

The record features Jimmy Buffett on two of the tracks, and is available now at iTunes for $5.99.

  1. Ocean Is My Potion (feat. Jimmy Buffett)
  2. Love You (When I’m Close To You)
  3. Rebel Soul
  4. Love and Roots
  5. When The Rain Comes Down
  6. Constant Revolution
  7. Trying To Reason With Hurricane Season (feat. Jimmy Buffett)

 

news_mishkaepCelebrated recording artist Mishka’s new release, the “Ocean Is My Potion” EP, is a journey back to his musical roots. Like Mishka himself, the album is imprinted with the sounds and emotions of the islands, with influences that range from the heavy bass of Reggae to the gulf and western stylings of Jimmy Buffett.

Mishka first met Jimmy Buffett when he was an entrepreneurial five year-old delivering fresh croissants to Jimmy’s sailboat in the French West Indies. The musician and young Mishka formed a fast bond, and Jimmy wrote and recorded a song about him called, “Chanson Pour Les Petis Enfants” which translates to, “Song For Little Children.”

When preparing to record his latest album, Mishka handpicked his support team, which led him back to his old friend from the islands. This album will be his first release on Mailboat Records.

Recorded at the famed Shrimpboat Sound Studio in Key West, the album features Mishka’s take on the Jimmy Buffett classic, “Trying to Reason with Hurricane Season.” The track features both famed musician Mac McAnally and Jimmy Buffett himself.

Born in Bermuda and raised in the Caribbean, Mishka’s music is a natural fit for Mailboat Records. Caribbean at its core, with an eclectic sound that blends island beats with mellow acoustic ballads, the music is amplified by the messages of love and social justice that are delivered straight from Mishka’s heart.

Mishka has played and toured with many artists, most notably Kenny Chesney, Zac Brown, Dirty Heads, Matisyahu and the Roots.

 Original Article

 

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Roots of Trop Rock – Zydeco

Posted in Reggae Roots Music | Comments Off on Roots of Trop Rock – Zydeco

Zydeco is a form of uniquely American roots or folk music. It evolved in southwest Louisiana in the early 19th century from forms of “la la” Creole music. The rural Creoles of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas still sing in Louisiana Creole French.

Zydeco combines elements of an even older American musical style which began in the late 1700s: Cajun music, which comprises French fiddle tunes, Irish Celtic fiddle tunes, German button accordion, Latin rhythms, and Appalachian styles.

Zydeco music was born in the late 1860s as a blend of Cajun music and two other “new” American music styles: blues and rhythm and blues. Haitian rhythms were also added, as Haitian natives moved to Louisiana to help harvest the new cash crop – sugarcane.

Zydeco (French, from the phrase: “Les haricots ne sont pas salés”, means “the snap beans aren’t salty”. This phrase is a colloquial expression that means ‘I have no spicy news for you.’[citation needed] It has alternatively been referred to as meaning “I’m so poor, I can’t afford any salt meat for the beans.” When spoken in the regional French, it is spoken thus: “leh-zy-dee-co sohn pah salay…”)

“In fact, the first Zydeco-ish recording was Clarence Garlows hit “Bon Ton Roula,” issued in 1949 on the Macys label.” Zydeco music pioneer Clifton Chenier, “The King of Zydeco”, made Zydeco popular on regional radio stations with his bluesy style and keyboard accordion.

Usually fast tempo and dominated by the button or piano accordion and a form of a washboard known as a “rub-board,” “scrub-board,” “wash-board,” orfrottoir, zydeco music was originally created at house dances, where families and friends gathered for socializing. Creoles do not consider themselves part of the black culture, but rather a mixture of Haitian, Native American, French, and Spanish known as “Quadronne” or “four-way”.[citation needed]

The original French settlers came to Louisiana in the late 1700s, sent by the King of Spain to help settle the Louisiana Territory. Arriving in New Orleans on seven ships, the settlers quickly moved into the bayous and swamps. There the French culture permeated those of the Irish, Spanish, Native Indian and German peoples already populating the area.

Sometimes the music was performed in the Catholic Church community centers, as Creoles were mostly Catholic. Later it moved to rural dance halls and nightclubs. As a result, the music integratedwaltzshufflestwo-stepsbluesrock and roll, and other dance music forms of the era. Today, zydeco integrates genres such as R&Bsoulbrass bandreggaehip hopskarockAfro-Caribbean and other styles, in addition to the traditional forms.

 

The Roots of Trop Rock – Reggae

Posted in Island Enthusiasts, Reggae Roots Music | 3 Comments »

You can hear the influences of Reggae Music throughout Trop Rock.

Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broader sense to refer to most types of Jamaican music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that originated following on the development of ska and rocksteady.

Reggae is most easily recognized by the rhythmic accents on the off-beat, usually played by guitar and/or piano, known as the skank. This pattern accents the second and fourth beat in each bar (or the “and”s of each beat depending on how the music is counted) and combines with the drums emphasis on beat three to create a unique feel and sense of phrasing in contrast to most other popular genres focus on beat one, the “downbeat”. The tempo of Reggae is usually felt as slower than the popular Jamaican forms, ska and rocksteady, which preceded it.[1] It is this slower tempo, the guitar/piano offbeats, the emphasis on the third beat, and the use of syncopated, melodic bass lines that differentiates reggae from other music, although other musical styles have incorporated some of these innovations separately.

Bob Marley is said to have claimed that the word reggae came from a Spanish term for “the king’s music”.[5] The liner notes of To the King, a compilation of Christian gospel reggae, suggest that the word reggae was derived from the Latin regi meaning “to the king”.

Reggae developed from skamento and R&B music in the 1960s. The shift from rocksteady to reggae was illustrated by the organ shuffle, which was pioneered by Jamaican musicians like Jackie Mittoo and Winston Wright. This new technique was featured in the transitional singles “Say What You’re Saying” (1967) by Clancy Eccles, and “People Funny Boy” (1968) by Lee “Scratch” PerryThe Pioneers‘ 1967 track “Long Shot Bus’ Me Bet” has been identified as the earliest recorded example of the new rhythm sound that became known as reggae.[7]

Early 1968 was when the first genuine reggae records were released: “Nanny Goat” by Larry Marshall and “No More Heartaches” by The Beltones. American artist Johnny Nash‘s 1968 hit “Hold Me Tight” has been credited with first putting reggae in the American listener charts.[8] Around that time, reggae influences were starting to surface in rock music. An example of a rock song featuring a slight taste of reggae rhythm is 1968’s “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” by The Beatles.[9]

Bob Marley in 1980.

The Wailers, a band started by Bob MarleyPeter Tosh and Bunny Wailer in 1963, are perhaps the most recognised band that made the transition through all three stages of early Jamaican popular music: ska, rocksteady and reggae. Other significant reggae pioneers include Prince BusterDesmond Dekkerand Ken Boothe.

Notable Jamaican producers who were influential in the development of ska into rocksteady and reggae include: Coxsone DoddLee “Scratch” PerryLeslie KongDuke ReidJoe Gibbs and King TubbyChris Blackwell, who founded Island Records in Jamaica in 1960, relocated to England in 1962, where he continued to promote Jamaican music. He formed a partnership with Trojan Records, founded by Lee Gopthal in 1968. Trojan released recordings by reggae artists in the UK until 1974, when Saga bought the label.

The 1972 film The Harder They Come, starring Jimmy Cliff, generated considerable interest and popularity for reggae in the United States, and Eric Clapton‘s 1974 cover of the Bob Marley song “I Shot the Sheriff” helped bring reggae into the mainstream.[3] By the mid 1970s, reggae was getting radio play in the UK on John Peel‘s radio show, and Peel continued to play reggae on his show throughout his career. What is called the “Golden Age of Reggae” corresponds roughly to the heyday of roots reggae.

In the second half of the 1970s, the UK punk rock scene was starting to form, and reggae was a notable influence. Some punk DJs played reggae songs during their sets and some punk bands incorporated reggae influences into their music. At the same time, reggae began to enjoy a revival in the UK that continued into the 1980s, exemplified by groups like Steel PulseAswadUB40, and Musical Youth. Other reggae artists who enjoyed international appeal in the early 1980s include Third WorldBlack Uhuru and Sugar Minott. The Grammy Awards introduced the Best Reggae Album category in 1985.

Early reggae

The “Early reggae” era can be looked as as starting in roughly 1968. The influence of funk music from American record labels such as Stax began to permeate the music style of studio musicians and the slowing in tempo that occurred with the development of rocksteady had allowed musicians more space to experiment with different rhythmic patterns. One of the developments which separated early reggae from rocksteady was the “bubble” organ pattern, a percussive style of playing that showcased the eighth-note subdivision within the groove. The guitar “skanks” on the second and fourth beat of the bar began to be replaced by a strumming pattern similar to mento and the so-called double chop that can be heard so audibly in the introduction of Bob Marley’s “Stir It Up” was developed during this time. More emphasis was put on the groove of the music, and there was a growing trend of recording a “version” on the B-side of a single. The mass popularity of instrumental music in the Ska and Rocksteady eras continued in reggae, producing some of the most memorable recordings of the early reggae era. Cover versions of Motown, Stax and Atlantic Records soul songs remained popular in early reggae, often helping Jamaican artists gain a foothold in foreign markets such as the U.K. As a testament to it’s far reaching impact in other markets, this era and sound of reggae is sometimes referred to in retrospect as “skinhead reggae” because of its popularity among the working class skinhead subculture in the UK during the late 1960s and early 1970s. One Caribbean band based in London, The Pyramids, even released an entire album dedicated to the unruly English youth culture under the name Symarip which featured songs such as “Skinhead Moonstomp” and “Skinhead Girl”. Eventually the, often experimental, sounds of early reggae gave way to the more refined sound made popular by Bob Marley’s most famous recordings. Indeed this era seems fittingly capped off by the 1973 release of “Catch A Fire”. Notable artists from this era include John HoltToots & the Maytals and The Pioneers.

Original Source

Anguilla’s Own, The Story Of Bankie Banx

Posted in Island Enthusiasts, Trop Rock Artists | Comments Off on Anguilla’s Own, The Story Of Bankie Banx

Music, it sets the tone for any occasion. It could be a day at the beach with friends, a road trip with the family or a slow dance with the one you hold dear. Music is the soundtrack to our lives.

I’ve written about this artist before, one of the legends of the Caribbean, but this video pretty much sums up what he and his energy is all about. Bankie Banx, from the island of Anguilla, has been singing his brand of folk reggae around the Caribbean and the world for more than 30 years.

Why am I writing about Banx again? I’ve received quite a few emails lately about island music and what songs would make a great Caribbean vacation playlist. Of coarse I’m going to say Buffett, Chesney, Mishka, Marley, Zac Brown, Boat Drunks…there’s a bunch. But if you want some real island sound you need to look at Bankie Banx. He’s been doing it for so long and has been doing it so right. Tons of articles have been written and countless minutes have been recorded of him and his band performing. What can I do to spread the word, I don’t know. All I know is he’s on my island mix and I want to share it with you.

Here’s a great video of Bankie Banx describing his music and why he does what he does.

Bankie puts on one of the biggest music festivals in the Caribbean. Moonsplash which happens has his beach bar, The Dunes Preserve takes place Thursday March 8, until Sunday March 11, 2012. This four day music festival draws some big names not just in reggae but from all genres. Here’s is some more information on Moonsplash.

If you don’t have Banx on your island/chill/reggae playlist yet here you go.

Still In Paradise – Bankie Banx

If you’ve had the chance to catch Bankie’s act at his bar on Anguilla I’d love to hear you’re story.

Cheers,
RumShopRyan

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Reggae Artist Niyorah, No Guts No Glory Official Music Video

Posted in Island Enthusiasts, Rum | Comments Off on Reggae Artist Niyorah, No Guts No Glory Official Music Video

NiyoRah is an up-and-coming Dominican-born, St. Thomas-raised artist who you may have heard as part of the Star Lion Family (heard on the compilation Talkin’ Roots Volume 1, amongst other albums). I stumbled on to his video over the weekend and it instantly caught my eye. It has a great message about peace, love and self improvement. Doesn’t most reggae convey those ideas?

Niyorah stands out from the mass of sing-jays out there with not only his expressive vocals, but also his ability to sing, chat, and even rap a bit (Purists should know that the rapping is kept to a minimum, though.). His lyrics are likewise unique and insightful. This video of “No Guts No Glory” is beautifully produced and the song is soulful and catchy.

No Guts No Glory Music Video by Niyorah

What do you think?

Bio

Nigel “NiyoRah” Olivacce was born on October 9, 1980 in the coastline village of Pointe Michel, Dominica. At age 4, he moved to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, with his family, and cultivated an interest in music through listening to artists in his father’s and uncle’s roots reggae collections, including Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Burning Spear and Lucky Dube. By age 16, NiyoRah began chanting on the streets about the life experiences of the Savan ghetto in downtown Charlotte Amalie.

At age 18, NiyoRah decided to pursue a career in reggae music. “Reggae had one of the greatest influences on my life. It’s the type of music I cling to for some mystical reason,” he says. “The most high guided me more than me myself.” He took on the name NiyoRah – a combination of his nickname growing up and out of respect for the omnipotent power of the sun. Music was a natural career choice because of his musically gifted family. His grandfather is an award-winning vocalist who sings Negro spirituals and gospel, while his aunt, Ophelia Olivacce Marie, is an international French-speaking artist heralded as “Dominica’s Songbird” for her style of cadence and calypso. In 1998, he was introduced by local reggae radio personality Ras Manny to Black Juice Records, a Virgin Islands-based recording company. He joined with six other reggae artists under the company to co-found Star Lion Family. His voice can be heard on Star Lion Family’s EP “Brighter Days” released in November 2003.

NiyoRah’s songs delve into a wide range of issues, including cultural living, love for nature, strengthening of all peoples, especially Africans, and spiritual growth. In concert, NiyoRah has performed in front of thousands, sharing the same stage with world renowned artists such as Sizzla, Capleton, Junior Reid, Buju Banton, Bunny Wailer, Glen Washington, Midnite Band, Junior Kelly, Marcia Griffiths, Eve, Erika Badu, and many others.

NiyoRah’s albums, “A Different Age” (May 2005), “Purification Session” (June 2006) and “Stolen scrolls” (June 2008), were all released under one of the Virgin Island’s top reggae labels, I Grade Records. His newly awaited and anticipated album, ” Feel Your Presence” is scheduled for release in June 2010 under his new record label Denkenesh Records, which was produced in the island of Jamaica during 2009. The album will feature the dynamic Jah Mason on the track entitled “Bruk Down Barrier” and the legendary Sugar Minott on the track entitled “World Jungle”.

Since the release of his first album, Niyorah has toured/performed on the east and west coast of the U.S., Hawaii, Venezuela, Guam and various Caribbean Islands. He has performed in front of thousands at festivals/events such as the World Social Forum, Reggae Rising, Baltimore African American Heritage Music festival and the Sierra Nevada World Music festival to name a few. With his experience and relentless approach to the stage, he is definitely a a spectacle to watch live with his band, the Jah Current band.

Cheers,
RumShopRyan

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